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Information Sheets

This section contains summaries of the main useful products developed thanks to the case studies activity. Links to the information sheets are also provided in the section “Case Studies” , for each specific sectors: Energy, Tourism, Wildfires and Integrated case study.   


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Records: 27


IS01-Advanced wind resource risk management


The variability of wind resources is directly linked to the energy yield of a wind farm. Throughout a wind energy project's life, it is currently unknown how much the wind resources could vary from one season to the next. The assumption is therefore made that long-term wind resource availability is constant; that future wind resource will reflect the past and its variability is consistent across all timescales. The potential risk that future wind resources could be significantly different over space and time is currently not assessed, nor have tools been made available to deal with this risk. This creates an uncertainty that affects investment and operations for wind projects and the grid network.


Authors: Melanie Davis (IC3), Fabian Lienert (IC3), Francisco J. Doblas-Reyes (IC3/ICREA)

IS02 - ADVANCED WIND RESOURCE RISK MANAGEMENT: Regional long-term wind speed scenarios


Most of the interest concerning wind modelling focuses on the very short-range (nowcasting) and on seasonal forecasts, because the largest part of the manageable risk is concentrated on these time- scales. However, the interaction with stakeholders, especially in the energy sector, has highlighted the need for more in-depth understanding of wind modelling capacities at a longer time scale, which may contribute to both site evaluation in the absence of very accurate wind atlases and to the assessment of risks that may affect the return on investments on longer time scales.


Authors: Sandro Calmanti (ENEA), Alessandro Dell’Aquila (ENEA)

IS03 - ADVANCED WIND RESOURCE RISK MANAGEMENT: Local long-term wind speed scenarios


Most of the interest concerning wind modelling focuses on the very short-range (nowcasting) and on seasonal forecasts, because the largest part of the manageable risk is concentrated on these time- scales. However, the interaction with stakeholders, especially in the energy sector, has highlighted the need for more in-depth understanding of wind modelling capacities at a longer time scale, which may contribute to both site evaluation in the absence of very accurate wind atlases and to the assessment of risks that may affect the return on investments on longer time scales.


Authors: Sandro Calmanti (ENEA), Alessandro Dell’Aquila (ENEA)

IS04-Advanced solar resource risk management


Solar radiation at the Earth surface is a key parameter for climate monitoring and drives many natural processes, whose understanding and modeling can benefit from an accurate characterization of the variability of solar resource (e.g. agriculture, forestry, meteorology oceanography). In addition, the assessment of incoming solar energy is essential for applications aimed at converting solar energy into electricity. Since the renewable energy market is expanding, the prediction of the availability of resources is becoming an increasingly urgent issue for the quantification of economic losses and limits the diffusion of the exploitation of renewable energy.


Authors: Sandro Calmanti (ENEA), Alessandro Dell’Aquila (ENEA)

IS06-Climate change projections of temperatures in high mountain areas


Increasing temperatures are a strong indicator of climate change for the Savoie tourism industry. Consequently, many actors have already underlined the importance of having access to projections differentiating between mid- and high-mountain areas. A product specifically developed for high-mountain areas would allow actors to better plan for the risks threatening some tourism activities such as mountain climbing, glacier trails and hiking. These risks (including falling blocks of ice and seracs), which have already been observed, could threaten traditional itineraries, increasing the level of difficulty of some trails. By better understanding future conditions, actors could adapt activities accordingly.


Authors: Clotilde Dubois (CNRM), Adeline Cauchy (TEC)

IS07-Bathing water in mountain lakes


Savoie’s lakes (for example, Bourget Lake) support many different water sports, including water skiing, sailing, wakeboarding and swimming. Water temperatures and their projected future changes affect these activities and the lake ecosystem. This information is therefore particularly relevant to tourism actors, providing them with data to help anticipate potential increasing tourist numbers (as other areas are potentially becoming less attractive from a climate point of view) and to develop activities in conjunction with future projections.


Authors: Adeline Cauchy (TEC), Christophe Chaix (MDP), Erika Coppola (ICTP), Clotilde Dubois (CNRM)

IS08-Decadal prediction of sea surface temperature off the Tunisian coast


Sea surface temperature (SST) changes have important impacts on the economy of coastal areas in the Mediterranean countries. Among other factors, SST changes influence the bathing water temperature, which is relevant for the coastal tourism sector. Here, near-term climate predictions performed with state-of-the-art initialised climate models are used to infer future changes in sea-surface temperatures off the eastern Tunisia coast, for coastal tourism applications. The relevant informative content, current limitations and future challenges for making valuable decadal SST predictions in the Mediterranean basin, are discussed.


Authors: Alessio Bellucci (CMCC), Panagiotis Athanasiadis (CMCC)

IS09-Sea Surface Temperature in Coastal Regions


Under climate change, bathing conditions are expected to change and these changes may have large impacts on coastal activities. Such impacts can be positive if we look at the opportunity to extend the bathing season as well as negative, taking into consideration the possible proliferation of jellyfish for example. Consequently, tourism stakeholders expressed the need for climate information about the possible change of sea surface temperature in the surrounding sea.


Authors: Clotilde Dubois (CNRM), Adeline Cauchy (TEC)

IS10-Applications of the UC statistical downscaling portal for wild fire and tourism studies


Many stakeholders request local climate information to assess the relationships between climate and impacts on ecosystems. However, Global Circulation Models (GCMs) are not able to produce future climate scenarios at the proper spatial scale required for the different impact-orientated applications. The statistical downscaling approach bridges the gap between the coarse resolution of the GCMs and the high resolution required by end-user applications, taking into account empirical relationships between large and local scale variables.


Authors: M.D. Frías (UC), A. Casanueva (UC), S. Herrera (UC), J. Bedia (CSIC-UC) and J.M. Gutiérrez (CSIC-UC)

IS12-SOLAR ENERGY IN AEROSOL-INFLUENCED AREAS


Solar radiation at the surface is the key climate variable for planning purposes for solar energy power plants. A good knowledge of the statistics of the surface downward shortwave radiation (direct and diffuse) is thus required to anticipate potential energy production or to understand the level of production of existing sites. For a given site, statistics at different temporal scales are needed: long-term averaged values, seasonal cycle, daily to hourly variability and forecasts.


Authors: S. Somot (Météo-France / CNRM), P. Nabat (Météo-France / CNRM)


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